The Seminole County Commissioner's Office in the Wewoka courthouse has moved over to the Seminole County District 1 Barn at 14097 Old Highway 99 Konawa, OK 74849. Office - 580-925-3692, email - bonnie.lose@seminolecountyoklahoma.gov

Seminole County Assessor's Office


The Seminole County Assessor is responsible for appraising real estate and assessing a property tax on properties located in Seminole County, Oklahoma. You can contact the Seminole County Assessor for:

  • Information on your property's tax assessment
  • Paying your property tax
  • Appealing your property tax appraisal
  • Checking the Seminole County property tax due date
  • Your property tax bill
  • Reporting upgrades or improvements

Property taxes are based on the value of the property. For example, the property tax on a vacant lot valued at $10,000 is usually ten times as much as one valued at $1,000 if located in the same taxing jurisdiction.

Property taxes are local taxes. Your county officials value your property, set your tax rates and collect your taxes. However, state law governs how the process works.

The property tax provides more tax dollars for local services in Oklahoma than any other source.

Property taxes help to pay for public schools, city streets, county roads, police, fire protection, and many other essential services.

The Oklahoma Constitution authorizes the property tax.

All tangible property must be taxed on its current market value. The exception is agricultural land.

A property's market value is the price for which it would sell when both buyer and seller want the best price and neither one is under pressure to buy or sell. Land used for farming and ranching is valued on its capacity to produce crops or livestock, instead of its value on the real estate market. This appraisal is known as agricultural use value.

All property is taxable unless otherwise exempted by federal or state law. An exemption may exclude all or part of a property's value from taxation.

Property owners have a right to notice of increases in appraised property value. The county assessor must notify you prior to any increase.